Suyabatmaz Demirel Architects

Arif Suyabatmaz, Hakan Demirel

Team O. Ülgen, E. Yazkurt, M.Uzman, S. A. Karaatlı, G. Ersel

Client Ahmet Oran

Location Bodrum/Turkey

Size 330 m2

“Ahmet Oran Atelier” is a private house which integrates with a studio, specifically designed keeping in mind the owner’s passion for the Arts. The site is in Bodrum, Yalikavak which is one of the most famous and picturesque holiday destinations in Turkey. As one of the characteristics of the region, the building is located on sloped land which has a partial sea view facing west. This partial view and a grand old tree located on the site are two important factors that have played a significant role in the design process. During the design process it was emphasized by the owner, who is a painter by profession, that this house was required to be more of an atelier than a spacious home. Thus, this project has become a charming integration of a traditional atelier and a breezy summer retreat for his family. The spatial analysis has been prepared to provide minor but efficient architectural moves to respond to user needs. The state of “being a home while providing an atelier” is frankly different from “being an atelier while providing residential facilities”. As the atelier is a very important consideration for the artist, great lengths have been taken to preserve its atelier characteristics for all major decisions regarding the building. Due to its location on the site, the atelier has been designed as a double-floor-height void, just like a cellar inside, and taking advantage of some of the best views of this location. While the best vista in the site defines the only opening for natural light, it also directs people to the terrace in front of the building with an overwhelming feeling of scale a light-drawing comparison to coming out of a tunnel.
The atelier is not exposed to direct light. However the window on the west direction of the upper level and the skylight over the staircase provides sufficient natural light for the necessary comfort level of the users. The building, which slowly tears itself away from the land while still being a part of it, begins to turn into other spaces that are designed towards the needs of a home when it’s not an atelier any more. The building situated on a rough land, behaves not like it is something built over the site but like it is an extension of the land. While the building goes into horizontal division with a strong stone wall retaining the land, this move distinguishes the service spaces from other functions. The welcoming entrance takes people in from a small void, and distributes them to different spaces through a staircase which goes up continually to the roof, situated in the upper level of the land. By means of the skylight over the staircase and the great tree located at the end of stairs, dull circulation areas turn out to be pleasant spaces which interact with an environment that is alive throughout day-night in changing seasons. Not only does the terraces formed in the building offer varied vistas to the user, but also helps users to allocate themselves visually from other dwellings located on lower levels. Thus, no visual connection is formed until a specific distance. The region consists of small white-washed structures as a typology in architecture. This case describes a regional language however; when the number of structures increases it begins to be something distasteful and disturbing. Instead of defining the building with similar white material and making it as a part of the whole, a different approach has been taken during the design process by using easily-found materials in the surrounding to define the regional language. The mass adopts a form of extension from the soil and develops a behavior like a chewing gum; transforming from solid and opaque to loose and transparent.

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